Get 25% Off All Products at Moo.com

If you’ve been around here for a while, you know that it’s no secret that I love moo.com. I first became aware of them when I won a business card redesign contest seven years ago. I immediately fell in love with the quality of their paper products and have used them over and over for various studio projects. Right now they are running a special 25% Off all MOO Print Products through July 25, so I’m putting together my wish list and piano studio practice incentive theme needs for next year so I can get my order in. If you’ve downloaded the free Composer Trading Game, now would be a great time to order your mini cards, too!


Please note: the links above are affiliate links, so if you purchase using them a small portion of the proceeds comes back to Music Matters Blog to help cover the costs of running the site. Thanks for supporting the music education community in this way!

Practice Habits Launches Member Community

Chris Owenby, founder of PracticeHabits.co, has been cranking out oodles of resources for piano teachers – from sheet music to technical exercises to helpful practice guides. He has put together a membership site that contains all of these and more. He’s offering a 30% discount for anyone who joins between now and midnight on July 21, so if you’re interested in checking out some of his creative works now is the time to do it!

Posture at the piano

One of the things that has been impressed on me over the years as I’ve grown in my understanding of proper piano technique is the importance of correct bench placement and height. This is often overlooked by pianists, but is essential for producing good tone quality, establishing correct hand position, and avoiding injuries. Here is a helpful page with explanations and pictures demonstrating proper bench height and posture at the piano: Proper Seating at the Piano

Also, here’s a post I wrote several years ago on Gravity, Strength, and Conduction – three areas I emphasize from the very first lesson to help students establish good technique habits.

Piano – The Book

This beautiful, interactive ebook has accomplished what no other iPad game or resource has yet been able to accomplish – it has gotten me excited about using the iPad with my students in their lessons! As much as I love technology, I confess that although I’ve wanted to figure out ways to incorporate it effectively in my teaching, there just hasn’t been anything compelling enough to motivate me to make it happen yet.

Piano – Evolution Design & Performance by David Crombie has changed all that! From the minute I downloaded and opened the ebook on my iPad, I was drawn in by the gorgeous images, accompanied by related audio files. Students always seems astonished when I first inform them that the piano didn’t always exist. 🙂 I love introducing them to the piano’s predecessors, showing them pictures of ornate harpsichords, explaining the contrasting action, and letting them listen to a demo of a harpsichord sound on the studio Clavinova. Now, I’m super excited to be able to open up this ebook on my iPad, show them the full color images and listen to quality audio recordings as we discuss the history of the piano.

You can also explore the evolution of electric pianos, peruse myriad styles of pianos (ever heard of the rocking piano?!), learn how the action works in upright and grand pianos, find out about the history of dozens of piano houses, and even discover some of the science behind how sound is generated. So fun!

Can you tell I love this ebook? I don’t receive a penny for any sales from it, but highly recommend it to every piano teacher, student, and enthusiast as a go-to resource for information about this magnificent instrument. You can view additional screenshots and download it from the iTunes website.

You may also want to check out David Crombie’s World Piano News website for all-things piano:

What incredible resources we piano teachers have at our fingertips!

Activate the Brain!

I love to attend workshops or participate in courses that really make me think. You know, ones where the presenter shares fascinating research or information, and then you have to process it yourself and figure out what to do with that information, or how to apply it to your situation. Sometimes it’s also nice to have people who have thought through the information for you and are willing to share how they’ve implemented it effectively in a variety of scenarios. Well, in her “Activate the Brain!” online course, Jennifer Foxx does both!

The course includes 11 modules and several sets of bonus resources, including a fillable pdf so you can take notes as you watch each video. Here are some highlights from the first few modules:

Module 1: Introduction
This has a hilarious video clip that will resonate with every teacher and parent!

Module 2: Activate the Brain!
Drawing on the research of several neurological specialists and educators, Jennifer gives an overview of the different parts and functions of the brain. She reveals how the reticular activating system may be the culprit when you attempt to review something with a student only to have them respond, “you never taught me that.” [Sound familiar to anyone else?? :-)]

She goes on to share how stress impacts a student’s ability to learn and then gives many practical tips that teachers can use in piano lessons. I appreciated the reminder of the importance of review for making neurological connections in the brain. Jennifer ends Module 2 with a “Recipe for an Engaged Brain” that provides lots of great food for thought!

Module 3: Bloom’s Taxonomy and the National Core Music Standards
Developed in 1956, Bloom’s Taxonomy laid the foundation for future educational philosophies and standards. Jennifer gave an overview of the triangle, explaining each part in more detail:

  • Remembering – Can the student recall the information?
  • Understanding – Can the student explain concepts?
  • Applying – Can the student use the information in a useful way?
  • Analyzing – Can the student distinguish between different parts?
  • Evaluating – Can the student justify a decision?
  • Creating – Can the student make something new?

Jennifer emphasized that while these are arranged as a triangle, there is no hierarchy in the relationships of each aspect of learning. Bloom’s Taxonomy is a theory, and as music teachers we should experiment and consider our own findings. After this, Jennifer went through the National Common Core Music Standards, sharing ideas and examples for each one.

As you can see, this Activate the Brain course is a wonderful combination of both learning philosophy and practical ideas to implement in your teaching. Just to whet your appetite, here are the remaining module topics:

  • Module 4: What is Engaged Learning?
  • Module 5: Teacher and Student Roles
  • Module 6: Learning Styles
  • Module 7: Teaching Styles, Strategies, and Techniques
  • Module 8: Create An Invitation to Learn
  • Module 9: Characteristics of Age Groups
  • Module 10: Over 30 Ways to Check for Understanding and Engagement
  • Module 11: Recap and Conclusion

If you’re looking for a way to continue your own education (from the comfort of your home!) and get the “wheels” spinning to come up with new ideas and approaches to try with your students, Activate the Brain would be a great course to take over the summer! And to make it an even sweeter deal, Jennifer is offering a special coupon code for all Music Matters Blog readers. Use the code ENGAGEDLEARNING to receive 15% off the course between now and June 30, 2017.

Playground Time!

Have you seen Kristin’s Piano Teacher’s Playground?

This is one of my favorite stops for fun, colorful, yet clean-looking free worksheets to use with my piano students. In fact, since our Vanishing Voices practice incentive theme incorporated doing a theory worksheet every three weeks to earn Mental Miles, I used her Scale Detective, Identifying Half and Whole Steps, and Spot the Note worksheets with multiple students throughout the year. I am always so grateful for the creativity and generosity of the music education community and the devoted teachers who make resources like this available for everyone!