Pictures and Easy Step-by-Step Instructions for Making Dozens of Musical Instruments

In conjunction with our rhythm-themed practice incentive, Beat the Pirates!, this year, I was thinking it would be cool to spend time at one of our group classes to make our own rhythm instruments. So I was thrilled to come across this wonderful page at DariaMusic.com that has dozens of musical instruments you can make using easy-to-find materials from your home!

Whether it’s a pair of bilmas to help you keep the beat, or a handy pie pan bodhran drum, Daria has pictures and instructions to guide you as you construct your own versions of each instrument. (Now if only I could find some real turtle shells, we could make authentic turtle shell rattles!) I’m excited to explore the possibilities, and would love to know if you have a favorite homemade rhythm instrument that students can make!

Playground Time!

Have you seen Kristin’s Piano Teacher’s Playground?

This is one of my favorite stops for fun, colorful, yet clean-looking free worksheets to use with my piano students. In fact, since our Vanishing Voices practice incentive theme incorporated doing a theory worksheet every three weeks to earn Mental Miles, I used her Scale Detective, Identifying Half and Whole Steps, and Spot the Note worksheets with multiple students throughout the year. I am always so grateful for the creativity and generosity of the music education community and the devoted teachers who make resources like this available for everyone!

Win a Free Membership to Musical U!


It’s hard to believe that Musical U is already celebrating 2 years! What Christopher Sutton began as EasyEarTraining.com in 2009 is now an invaluable resource for anyone seeking to improve their knowledge and skills as a musician. To celebrate their 2-year anniversary as Musical U, they are giving away several free memberships to aspiring musicians. This would be a great resource for older students who want to go beyond the scope of what a traditional piano lesson will cover, friends, or parents of kids in your studio who have always dreamed of becoming better musicians.

The ear training section of the website still has a plethora of information and resources for those who want to develop a better ear and more musical playing.

Mini Music Manual Review by Piano Teacher Resources

Chris Owenby, of PracticeHabits.co, has not only written a wonderful review of our Mini Music Manual, but has also made a special offer that anyone who purchases one by the end of today, April 22, will receive a free piece of sheet music from his shop! Wow, what a kind and generous offer!

The Mini Music Manual has been a great way for my students to take ownership of their learning, memorize new musical terms, keep track of scale fingerings, and take notes on anything else of interest to them.

Review and Giveaway of the Flexi Symphony Clip

Anyone who knows me well knows that I am a far cry from a fashionista. My hairstyle and accessory choices are driven by whatever takes me the least time in the morning (because there are so many things I would rather do than spend time fixing my hair!). So when Jackie Adams, a Lilla Rose consultant, asked me to review her symphony hair clip, I confess that I was somewhat reluctant. But I decided to give it a try, and a few days later a complimentary beautiful flexi hair clip arrived in the mail.


I am a bit of a sucker for attractive packaging, so it probably helped that it arrived in a very cute little envelope with a full color brochure included. 🙂 However, I must say I have been pleasantly surprised at how much I like it! (After viewing the handy sizing chart video, I determined that the small would be the best fit for me.)


It is SO easy to just pull back the sides of my hair, stick in the flexi clip and go! What’s really impressive is that it doesn’t slide out like so many other barrettes and clips that I’ve tried.


So…if you’re curious to give this a try (or have a student who might enjoy it!) just leave a comment below to be entered in a drawing for your own symphony flexi clip! If you win, Jackie will contact you to get your size preference. In the meantime, feel free to check out the website for other products and visit her Facebook page for more info. The winner will be chosen using a random number generator at noon (CST) on Friday, February 3!


Jackie Adams is the latest advertiser here at Music Matters Blog. We are grateful for her support of the online music education community! If you are interested in finding out more about how you can promote your company, event, or product, just send us an e-mail and we will let you know about our advertising packages.

The Speedy Scale Game for Piano Students!

As I mentioned last week, I love to incorporate a variety of games to reinforce and evaluate music theory concepts with my students. This week we tried a Speedy Scale game to help students develop visual-spatial skills (they weren’t allowed to look at the piano keyboard, but had to visualize it in their mind) and put their music scale theory knowledge into practice (they’ve all been memorizing scale patterns this year to earn Mental Miles as part of our Vanishing Voices practice incentive theme)!

Daniel caught on really quickly, so I talked him into doing a step-by-step video of how to play this game during a lesson:

Here’s a snapshot of the supplies needed:

  • Two complete octaves of scale blocks (see here for a post on how to make your own scale blocks!)
  • A set of plain blocks with each one containing only one note name
  • A block with Major and Minor written on alternating sides
  • A block with a sharp, flat, and natural sign drawn on alternating sides


This is a quick, fun activity that is easily adaptable to students of all ages and levels. Since Alyssa just started lessons last fall she is just finishing up learning all of her Major pentascales. So in her case, I just had her select a block with a note name and then roll the sharp, flat, natural sign block, then arrange the scale blocks according to the pattern for the Major pentascale.


  1. After students had drawn a note name block from my hand and rolled the other two blocks, I walked them through this process for figuring out the arrangement of the scale blocks:
  2. Find the two scale blocks with the given key name (Stephanie’s was e-flat minor, so she found the two e-flats and placed them at the beginning and end).
  3. Fill in the remaining note names in alphabetical order with no regard for which ones are sharps or flats.
  4. Review the pattern for the given type of scale (we just used the Major and natural minor scales today) and write it out on the board if necessary.
  5. Begin with the “tonic” and work your way through the whole and half steps, rotating the blocks as necessary to represent the scale (a couple of times when students were tempted to switch out a block for something else – especially those pesky white key flats and sharps – it was essential that they remember they could only use the block that was next alphabetically!).

Each of the students thoroughly enjoyed this activity, and it was neat to see how much they improved just in the short 5-10 minutes we used at the beginning of the lesson!

The Creative Juices are Flowing!

After seeing Alyssa’s creative composition a few weeks ago, Stephanie and Claire were inspired to create their own musical sketch for a fun duet they were working on. They polished up their performance of Jalapeno Hop by Melody Bober and Stephanie drew the artwork for the accompanying story about a couple of jalapeno museum robbers. Here’s what they came up with:

A Creative Composition Project

In case anyone here didn’t already know how in love I am with the Piano Safari method, I thought I would share a highlight from the lesson this week with my new beginning student Alyssa. We learned the piece, Outer Space from the Level 1 book over the last couple of weeks. Outer Space is a perfect combination of rote learning, composition, and creativity.

The main theme is taught by rote, but then the student is asked to draw a picture representing a couple of objects from space and compose an ending to match each one. Alyssa chose Saturn and Jupiter for hers and we discussed what things the planets have in common and what different characteristics they have. We also listened to some excerpts from Holst’s suite The Planets for inspiration!

I told her that if she could draw full page images for each of the endings – Saturn, Jupiter, and the given shooting star for the final ending – that we could create a simple music video to go with them. We used my Nessie mic, the free Audacity recording software, and iMovie to put together this simple, but memorable creation.

How fun for students to begin experiencing the joys of music composition, creativity, and technology within the first several months of lessons. There is a whole world just waiting to be explored and discovered!

The Seventh Annual Cliburn International Amateur Piano Competition Winners

If you’re looking for some viewing and listening pleasure this summer, you might enjoy checking out these videos of the finalists and winners from the Seventh Annual Cliburn International Amateur Piano Competition.

The first prize winner, audience award winner, and press award winner was 38-year old Thomas Yu, a periodontist from Calgary, Alberta, Canada. It’s not hard to see why! Here’s his final round performance of the third movement of the Saint-Saens Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, op .103 (“Egyptian”):

Summer Coupon – Save $5!

To celebrate the arrival of June/summer, we’re offering a special coupon for $5 off of anything in the Music Matters Blog store! Whether you are looking for some fun games to incorporate throughout the summer, a complete piano camp curriculum, or are exploring possibilities for a motivating practice incentive theme you can launch next year, find the perfect fit for you and your students to infuse your teaching with something new and exciting! The coupon is good through this Saturday, June 5, so have fun shopping! Just use this code when checking out to receive $5 off: SUMMER