Top 5 Songs to Learn on Piano in 2016 – A Guest Post by MusicNotes.com

Many music lovers resolved to learn or practice an instrument in 2016, and one of the most popular instruments to pick up is the piano. Once you learn to read sheet music, you can see the tiny intricacies of each song right there on paper, and really feel inspired by the instrument. MusicNotes.com is a great resource for popular and classic sheet music, where there are multiple versions of these piano favorites: 

1. Space Oddity: The somber beauty of this classic by the late David Bowie is sure to engage even the most frustrated player. Its use of simple chords is impressive, yet not too hard to master.

2. Fur Elise: The opening notes of one of Beethoven’s most popular songs command attention and make listeners tune in. The song is also famous for exciting changes, twists, and turns that will challenge you as you learn.

3. All of Me: Learn this romantic smash hit by John Legend on the piano and you’ll have a hard time not singing along. The sheet music is easy to follow and the song is easy to learn (maybe even in time for Valentine’s day)!

4. Hello: Adele’s songs are sure to stir emotion and inspire learners to keep trying. You’ll love playing this song once you learn it.

5. Piano Man: Once people know you are a piano enthusiast, chances are, they’ll ask you about “Piano Man,” by Billy Joel. Luckily, it’s a crowd pleaser that’s easy to learn.

Learning music by actually reading it on the page allows you to engage with the song and take ownership of your own style. Those little black dots and lines on the page are laden with meaning, and you’ll have a visual reference point for the way the song moves up and down the scales.

Of course, the most important thing about learning piano or another instrument is to stay dedicated to learning and practice, practice, practice. Try setting up a daily time slot in your schedule that is dedicated to playing and listening to piano music. It’s also helpful to watch others play the songs you’re trying to learn. If you compare what you’re seeing to sheet music, you might be amazed at how quickly you pick it up.

Bonus: For first-timers or people who need a refresher, MusicNotes.com has a nice little cheat sheet that you can download and print for free and prop up on the piano as you get your fingers used to the keys.


Musicnotes.com is our newest advertiser here on Music Matters Blog, and we are grateful for their support of the online music education community! If you are interested in finding out more about how you can promote your company, event, or product, just send us an e-mail and we will let you know about our advertising packages.

How to Get the Most Out of Online Music Resources – Guest Post by Christopher Sutton

[Note from Natalie: Be sure to enter the giveaway for a free Musical U membership!]


No matter what stage you’re at in your music education, there are countless online resources to help you grow as a musician and expand your knowledge and training. From video tutorials to user forums, and from how-to articles to training modules, there are all types of online learning tools to help you take your musical abilities to the next level.

But how do you find the tools and resources that will work for you, at your level of musical training? And how do you know if you’re really getting the most bang for your buck when you make use of those online resources?

Make a Plan

The key to getting the most from online music resources is to make a plan for how you’re going to use them. In order for online tools to benefit you once you discover them, you’ll need to stay involved and use them regularly. Decide how much time you’ll be able to dedicate to your online music training on a daily and weekly basis, and then stick to it. You don’t need huge amounts of time, you just need to ensure that you’re checking and using your resources consistently.

Maybe that means watching a YouTube tutorial every night after dinner, or catching up on recent blog posts every Sunday. Just as with regular music practice sessions, a small amount of time dedicated to learning each and every day will make a huge difference in how quickly you improve.

Ask Questions

Struggling with a particular concept or lesson? Having a hard time nailing that one song? Don’t wait passively for the answers to fall into your lap; seek them out yourself! Actively asking questions is a crucial part of making the most of online music resources. If something written in a blog post or article doesn’t make sense to you, leave a comment and ask for clarification. If there’s a particular video tutorial you’re interested in seeing but can’t seem to find anywhere online, submit a request.

Online communities for musicians are all about learning via dialogue; it’s up to you and your peers to make that dialogue happen. Teachers, moderators, and managers of online resources are there to help you and provide the content that you want, but it’s hard for them to know what you’re looking for and what you’d like to learn about if you stay silent.

Connect with Others

Musicians who learn to play instruments solely via online resources may at times feel isolated from the music community. When you’re spending all of your time learning to make music from your own home, you’re missing out on the experience of connecting with and learning from other musicians. Don’t make that mistake!

Guide to Finding an Online Community

If you’re just starting your search for an online musicians community, use these tips to help you get started:

Know How to Search

Spend some time browsing various online communities for musicians and try to find one that will adequately meet your needs at your level. You may find one that works for you by doing a quick Google search (for instance, “online communities for bass players”) or by checking with online resources you already use to see if they offer any forums or other methods of communication between users.

If you’re already a member of one online learning site and would like to join another, find out if your community has any partners or affiliates. Chances are, they have plenty of connections or recommendations and can point you in the right direction.

Know What you Need

Carefully consider which specific needs you want your online music community to meet. Do you want a group that will challenge and push you to grow as a musician, or just an outlet for staying connected to the music world? Are you looking for a site like Musical U which provides both training resources and a friendly supportive community? Would you prefer a community that is focused on your current stage of musical training (beginner, advanced, etc.) or one that will be suitable throughout your musical development?

Know Your Involvement Level

You’ll also need to consider what level of involvement you’d like to achieve within your community. Are you content with monthly emails, or do you want a space where you can chat with other users and members regularly? Check out your online community’s blog to see how often they post, and their discussion forum to see how active other users are. Subscribe to emails to find out how frequently you’ll receive updates. These should all give you an idea of how involved your community is and what level of commitment you’ll need to stay in the loop.

Don’t wait—start looking for your perfect online musicians community today, and start taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge and resources they have to offer to transform and accelerate your music learning.

If you’re ready to get involved and start making the most of online music resources, two great places to start are the Musical U community and of course the community right here on the Music Matters Blog!


Christopher Sutton is the founder of Easy Ear Training and Musical U, where musicians can discover and develop their natural musicality. Born and raised in London, England he lives with his wife and far too many instruments.

Learning to Play the Piano Benefits You in Numerous Ways – Guest Post by Dustin Williams

Learning to play the piano provides numerous health benefits. Individuals find they experience less stress upon learning to play this instrument and their cognitive development and eye-hand coordination improve. Thanks to home study courses, anyone can now be playing this instrument in a short period of time.

The Benefits of Learning to Play the Piano

A study published in Cognitive Systems Research showed eye-hand coordination improves when one learns to play the piano, and regular practice on a daily basis instills discipline in the child. Neuropsychology reported in a 2011 study which found that musical training protects mental sharpness during the aging process, while the British Journal of Psychiatry found that music therapy successfully helps to treat depression.

Barry Bittman, a Pennsylvania physician, and Loma Linda University School of Medicine researchers found learning to play an instrument helps individuals to relax and stimulate their immune system. Furthermore, E. Glenn Schellenberg, of the University of Toronto at Mississauga, found that children who undergo music training witness a rise in their IQ. These are only a few of the numerous benefits of learning to play the piano.

Playground Sessions

Individuals wanting to learn to play the piano may find Quincy Jones’ Playground Sessions to be of great help. The program features innovative technology to teach users how to play the piano using video lessons. The program makes use of popular songs, so the user already knows the rhythm, and this makes learning come more quickly and naturally. The beats and rhythms of these songs are used to demonstrate musical concepts in the various lessons, and users learn to play by ear, make their way around the keyboard and more. Students may choose from the rookie, intermediate or advanced tour options.

Interactive Video Lessons

With the help of interactive video lessons, students quickly learn to play the piano. Each song is broken down in simple steps, making the music theory concepts easy to grasp. The student first views how to play the song, and then he or she plays along with the instructor. Constructive feedback is offered along with helpful tips.

Engaging Instruction

David Sides, known for his “Apologize” rendition on the piano, provides the lessons, ensuring users stay engaged. Sides makes use of progress visualizations to help students stay on track, such as charts, and students find the charts allow them to see where they are excelling and where more practice is needed. Seeing improvement in various areas helps to keep students motivated.

The Gaming Element

Real time scores and feedback allow the user to make adjustments immediately. This prevents bad habits from being formed and encourages the user to try harder to beat his or her last score. When a note is played correctly, it turns green. When the student is close, the note changes to a pink color. Miss the note completely and it turns red. The gaming element makes learning to play piano fun and something children will look forward to doing.

Individuals wishing to learn to play piano need to consider this program in their search for lessons, as many find it to be helpful. Playground Sessions offers the tools needed to succeed in mastering this instrument.


Playground Sessions is our newest advertiser here on Music Matters Blog, and we are grateful for their support of the online music education community! If you are interested in finding out more about how you can promote your company, event, or product, just send me an e-mail and I’ll let you know about our advertising packages.

8 Things You Didn’t Know About Piano Technique – A Guest Post by Doug Hanvey

A Word from Natalie: Perhaps the most impactful thing I have learned in my years of playing and teaching piano is the importance of understanding and properly using the body to achieve artistic playing with the greatest ease. The three greatest catalysts of this in my own education were: my teacher and mentor, Sylvia Coats, attending a one-week Suzuki teacher training led by Doris Koppelman, and the fabulous workshops of Beth Grace on Beyond Scales and Hanon. I have experienced first-hand the immeasurable value of using proper technique when playing piano, and I have seen students (both my own, transfer students, and students I have taught in masterclass settings) suddenly accomplish musically or technically what they didn’t think was possible when I help them understand the basic principles of Gravity, Strength, and Conduction. So I am excited to host Doug Hanvey as a guest today because he touches on some of these issues that have been “game-changing” for me. I hope his points pique your interest and propel you to either begin or continue your journey to understanding the amazing design of the human body and how it can be maximally employed by you and your students to become excellent pianists!


1. Anatomy Is the Foundation of Technique

Seems like anatomy should be part of piano pedagogy, but did your musical mentors teach you much about it? Maybe you think of your body like a car – as long as it’s running, and a mechanic is only a phone call away, there’s no pressing need to understand how it works. While we “use” the body to play piano like we use a car to drive over to Aunt Edna’s, the body is not the same as a car. You are in command of your body’s movements to an infinitely greater degree than the mostly automated, mechanical motions of a car. And these movements are infinitely more complex than a car’s will ever be. A correct and thorough understanding of how your body works to play piano can only be to your advantage.

2. Your Body Does Not Control How You Play

Every piano player has a “body map,” an internal representation of the body that is used to determine how you move to play. Strictly speaking, it is your body map, not your body, that determines your movements. Unfortunately, a body map may be inaccurate or even outdated. But just as the explorers who followed Columbus made ever more accurate maps of the New World, we can make a more accurate body map based on our understanding of anatomy suffused with an inclusive awareness of the body.

3. Concentration Can Impede Healthy Technique

The concentration demanded of pianists can contribute to unhealthy technique. Concentration is one-pointed attention. When we are concentrated – for example, on the music in front of us – we may be less than fully aware (or not aware at all) of our body, breathing, and movements. This doesn’t mean you should stop concentrating, but consider the value of bringing more awareness of the body and its movements into each moment of playing.

4. You Should “Map” the Whole Body

You should understand, feel, and “map” your whole body, not just the arms and hands. For example, the arms and hands aren’t separate from the spine, which bears so much of the body’s weight and is directly relevant to technique. (Interestingly, it is the front part of the spine, closest to the center of the body, that is the weight-bearing part, not the bony structure running down the back that we usually think of as the spine.) By becoming aware of the support provided by the spine we can enhance the efficient movement of the arms and hands.

5. Balance Is More Important Than Posture

If you feel like it takes a lot of effort to sit up straight, you may not be in balance. When you are balanced your skeleton supports your posture with minimal effort required. If you are out of balance, you are probably using muscular effort to maintain your posture, which can lead to chronic tension and contaminate efficient movement in other parts of the body.

6. Resolving Neck Tension Is Vital

Most people these days carry unnecessary neck tension. (As I type this I’m well aware that I’m one of them.) Neck tension can be particularly detrimental for pianists. It can hinder arm movement and even inhibit healthy nerve impulses to the arms. A relaxed neck helps us play with a freer motion and supports optimal balance (see above). If you carry habitual neck tension, do what you can to resolve it so it doesn’t affect your playing in the long term.

7. Bench Height Is More Important Than You Thought

An optimal bench height keeps your elbows on about the same level as the tops of the white keys, giving you the best mechanical advantage for playing. Many, if not most, benches are too low for most people.

8. Your Fingers are Not Attached to Your Hands

If I asked you where your fingers begin, you would probably point to your knuckles. But the fingers are actually attached to the wrist! Try moving your fingers right now and see if you can feel this for yourself. (This is an example of what is involved in developing an accurate body map.)

To learn more about anatomy and body mapping, check out Thomas Mark’s What Every Pianist Needs To Know About the Body. Mark’s book contains valuable information for piano teachers, pianists who want to develop the best possible technique, pianists who have been injured, and pianists who want to avoid injury – meaning just about everyone that plays the piano.


Doug Hanvey offers piano lessons in Portland, OR. He writes educational articles for piano students and piano teachers on his studio website’s blog, which can be found at the above link.

3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars – Guest Series by Kristin Jensen

3. Apply it
What is the one thing you could do that would best give kids the internal drive to master music theory? Teach them the application.

When kids realize that music theory empowers them to create their own fun songs they’ll want to learn everything they can from you.

Far too often kids study the piano for years and years, but then can’t play a thing if they don’t have a piece of sheet music in front of them. What happens if they get asked to “play something” when they don’t have a piece worked up? They’re embarrassed and find themselves feeling that their lessons have failed them to some degree.

If a student really understands his instrument, he should be able to make music—even if he doesn’t have a sheet in front of him.

Music theory teaches us how music works, and if you can help your students realize that applying their theory will open a whole new world of enjoyment at the piano, they will thank you forever.

Kids can start applying their theory even as young beginners. When you introduce a new concept, ask kids to go home and create a song that uses this new principle. You’ll find that kids learn the concept faster, are thrilled to play their song for you and their confidence at the piano skyrockets.

For some fun exercises that get kids creating impressive songs using their theory knowledge, you can check out these piano improv activities. You definitely want to teach the “Snowflake Technique” to your students—it’s super easy and sounds awesome:

When your students know their theory well they’ll make faster progress in their lessons, learn new songs with less frustration and spend hours at the piano having fun creating their own music. Remember these three tips for getting kids excited about learning theory: make it fun, make it social and teach the application. Before you know it, your students will become music theory rockstars!

A huge thanks to Kristen Jensen for sharing her wonderful tips and resources with us in this series, 3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars. Kristin Jensen is a piano teacher who specializes in teaching children to create their own music. Kristin is supported by a wonderful husband and two darling boys (ages 3 and 1) who keep her on her toes, but make life lots of fun. Check out her website at EarTrainingAndImprov.com for lots of free resources and downloadable worksheets.

3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars – Guest Series by Kristin Jensen

2. Make it social

Studying piano can be kind of lonely. Kids practice by themselves. Then they sit in a small room with an “old” teacher who for 30 minutes tells them everything they’re doing wrong. Then they go home and repeat.

One reason why so many kids end up choosing sports over piano is that their friends are there with them. And when friends are together, there’s laughter, camaraderie and the desire to succeed together.

There is a way to make piano a more social experience, and that is to offer group theory lessons. You could do a group theory class once a month, or maybe offer a special theory master class anytime there is a 5th Monday in a month. Maybe you could get even more creative with your scheduling. I provide a group theory class almost every week–my students love coming, have developed strong friendships and are learning a ton.

Plus some friendly competition goes a long way in motivating kids to nail down new concepts! When kids are playing a game with their friends they have much more incentive to master the principles because they want to be included in the fun and they want to do well in the game.

Here’s a favorite group activity that is as old as the hills and has a million variations, but is really effective. Knowing note names is a foundational skill that kids will build upon for virtually everything else we do in music theory, so it’s always my goal to help students learn the names of the notes on the staff as quickly as possible. We do this activity a lot! To play, place a printout of the grand staff in a page protector and give a copy to each student. Then give each student a mini marshmallow and call out a note name. All students who place their marshmallow on the correct line or space get to eat it. You’ll be able to play many rounds of this “note name drill” because your students will want more treats!

Ear training is also great in a group. Ear training is something can easily be neglected, but it makes a world of difference in students’ musicianship. When your students are just getting started, use simple ear training games like playing two notes and asking students to call out if the notes are the same pitch or two different pitches. Gradually work your way into more advanced exercises (using fun activities, of course), and before long, your students will have a well-trained ear that helps them quickly learn their favorite songs.

Come back tomorrow for Part Four in the series 3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars by Kristin Jensen. Kristin Jensen is a piano teacher who specializes in teaching children to create their own music. Kristin is supported by a wonderful husband and two darling boys (ages 3 and 1) who keep her on her toes, but make life lots of fun. Check out her website at EarTrainingAndImprov.com for lots of free resources and downloadable worksheets.

3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars – Guest Series by Kristin Jensen

Now that you know the three steps, let’s dive a little deeper into each one and learn some specific action steps you can take to implement these practices in your studio.

  1. Make it fun

When I was a student, learning theory meant doing written assignments out of a workbook at home. I always completed my assignments, but I usually put it off and had to race to quickly fill in my answers right before my lesson started. Theory was boring and I didn’t put a lot of thought into it.

I’ve learned that theory doesn’t have to be boring. And when we make it fun, kids eat it up!

My students who are working on key signatures have a blast with this Paper Airplane Review Game that is super simple to pull off in a group lesson. We first do a worksheet to review the key signatures, and then I give each student a blank grand staff and a plain white sheet of paper. Students write the name of a key signature on their plain paper and then fold it into a paper airplane. On the count of three everyone throws their airplane into the air and then races to catch another plane. Students then go to their grand staff and draw the sharps or flats needed to complete their key signature.

Here’s a game that my little students enjoy when they are first being introduced to the names of the piano keys. I call it Twist and Play. The student stands with her back to the piano. I call out the name of a piano key and she quickly turns around and plays the key. We’ll repeat the fun, silly twisting until we’ve reviewed all the keys, and it’s so fun to see these little ones giggling during a “drill.”

I love to issue challenges and tie those challenges in to our unit’s theme. For example, if we’re doing a cowboy theme and I have a bunch of students working on interval recognition, I might issue the “Bucking Bronco” challenge: everyone who can identify 5 intervals from our flashcards in 30 seconds *without counting lines and spaces* at next week’s lesson gets a prize.

I also like to use fun worksheets with my students. The key word there is “fun.” Kids decide whether or not they’re going to like something within milliseconds after first seeing it. So if a worksheet looks boring, kids immediately decide they won’t like the exercise.

But if a worksheet looks fun, kids will be excited to complete it. I’ve created tons and tons of fun, colorful, kid-friendly music theory worksheets and you are more than welcome to use them with your students.

Don’t forget to capitalize on kids’ excitement for the holidays! Reviewing the same old concept again can suddenly become interesting if it’s tied into a holiday theme. I have lots of printables and game ideas for Christmas, Halloween, and Valentine’s Day that you are welcome to incorporate into your lessons.

As you can see, it really isn’t all that hard to make learning music theory fun. Five minutes away from the bench during a lesson for a game or a kid-friendly worksheet can work wonders, making your students much more excited for their lessons and setting them on their way to becoming music theory rockstars.

Come back tomorrow for Part Three in the series 3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars by Kristin Jensen. Kristin Jensen is a piano teacher who specializes in teaching children to create their own music. Kristin is supported by a wonderful husband and two darling boys (ages 3 and 1) who keep her on her toes, but make life lots of fun. Check out her website at EarTrainingAndImprov.com for lots of free resources and downloadable worksheets.

3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars – Guest Series by Kristin Jensen

It was a special day when my first two 4 year old students aced the first grade level theory exam. Kids have proven to me time and again that they are capable of doing so much more than we realize.

Those two four year-olds really stretched my creativity as a teacher as I realized that they could go far, but needed to be taught with an approach that capitalized on their fun-loving nature. Now all my students are benefiting from this new approach and learning at an accelerated rate. I’d like to share three tips I’ve learned along the way that help kids become music theory rockstars.

  1. Make it fun

Theory really can be fun, and kids learn so much more when they’re enjoying the experience. Continue reading for ideas and games you can easily fit into your lessons.

  1. Make it social

Consider teaching theory in a group setting. Kids love learning alongside friends and a group of peers can motivate each other to excel.

  1. Apply it

Help kids understand why theory is important. The best and most fun way to accomplish this is to teach them how to create their own songs.

Now that you know the three steps, let’s dive a little deeper into each one and learn some specific action steps you can take to implement these practices in your studio…

Come back tomorrow for Part Two in the series 3 Tips to Turn Students into Music Theory Rockstars by Kristin Jensen. Kristin Jensen is a piano teacher who specializes in teaching children to create their own music. Kristin is supported by a wonderful husband and two darling boys (ages 3 and 1) who keep her on her toes, but make life lots of fun. Check out her website at EarTrainingAndImprov.com for lots of free resources and downloadable worksheets.

The Beauty of Having a Digital Station in Your Studio – A Guest Post by Susan Nicholes

Do you want to have students who sight read well?  Students who get excited when they are given new and challenging assignments?  Students who are able to utilize the new technology available only on a digital piano?  If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions then you will definitely need to add a digital station within your studio.

Why have a digital piano station?

As you read about my digital piano station keep in mind that I have three stations in my piano studio configuration.  I have a digital piano station, a computer station and an acoustic station where I teach my students one-on-one as in a traditional lesson.  My students stay at each station for 25 minutes and then switch to the other two stations. They attend piano lessons for a total of 75 minutes.  Understanding my studio configuration will be helpful as you read the following reasons for having a digital station.   At one time I had two stations, a digital piano station and an acoustic piano station and my students attended their lessons for one hour total and spent 30 minutes at each station.  If you are interested in further information about having stations within your studio I detail how to do this in a series of seminars which I have titled Susan’s Seminars for Piano Teachers* which can be found at www.musicteacherstore.com.

1)    Students have time to prepare for their lessons at the bench with their teacher.  This time spent at the digital station is very useful in preparation for their lesson time as it provides a run through and a warm-up of their songs.  As a result, their private lesson goes more smoothly with less errors and problem measures or passages in their music .  Who doesn’t like a run-through before performing in front of any audience?

2)    Use of the digital station allows students time to become comfortable on the digital piano and allows more proficiency in using various settings and instrumentations on this instrument.

3)    Our students are millennials and they are very comfortable with using any type of computer-based equipment—and this describes a digital piano!

How to set up a digital piano station

1)     It is ideal if the digital piano faces away from any distracting scenery.  Place your digital piano carefully so that your students can focus on the assignments that you would like them to complete while at the digital piano.

2)    Make sure that your students have adequate lighting in this work space.

3)    If you choose to have a Music Library in your studio, it is convenient to place it nearby the digital piano so that students have access to the music as they spend time at this station.

4)    You can place an assignment board in front of the digital piano.  This can be very helpful in helping students see their expected tasks to be completed while they are at this station.

What are some possible student assignments at the digital station?

1)      Students can play at least 2 lines of sight reading.   I use “What’s That Note” Books 1 and 2** for my beginning through Level 2 students as sight reading curriculum.  I love these books written by my mother, Jane Calder, because they contain both rhythm exercises and gradual note reinforcement  through the grand staff.  For my more advanced students, Levels 3 – 5,  I use “A Line a Day”  books 1 – 4 for general sight reading assignments.  I have made midi recordings of the exercises in “What’s That Note” and also “A Line a Day” which students use as they play along with these recordings.  If the students are playing correct notes and rhythm they do not hear the recording which they are matching.  If they play incorrect notes or rhythm they will hear the correct teacher recorded part which will sound different from the notes or rhythm that they are playing.  Using these recordings as students play these sight reading assignments makes these exercises self-correcting.

2)    After completing their 2 or more lines of sight reading my students record their progress on a personal log sheet which they keep in their assignment binder.

3)    I am preparing my digital piano station at this time for my students to use the interactive Piano Marvel*** program to enhance their sight reading skills.  I currently have several students in my studio who have subscribed to Piano Marvel and use Piano Marvel in their homes each day as part of their assigned daily practice time.   My students who have used Piano Marvel in their homes have really enjoyed progressing through the various levels in Piano Marvel and have enjoyed being awarded trophies as they have improved their sight reading skills on various songs.  In studio I will provide each student with a log sheet where they will record their personal achievement using Piano Marvel each week during their digital station time in my studio.

Good luck with setting up your new digital piano station or enhancing your current digital piano station.   Your students will enjoy every moment that they spend at the digital station.   The musical experience at lesson time is enhanced with the technology of a digital piano and all of its capabilities.

*Susan’s Seminars for Piano Teachers can be located at www.musicteacherstore.com under Teaching Aids (main category) Teacher Improvement (sub category). Many topics are covered and include the following three topics  Maximizing one-on-one time with your students, Piano Camp is great for Teachers and Students, and Group lessons are fun and informative for both students and teachers.  Seminars are downloadable and available in 8 different topics.

**What’s That Note Books 1 and 2 are available in both book and downloadable format at www.musicteacherstore.com.

***Piano Marvel can be viewed at www.pianomarvel.com.  There is a discounted monthly subscription rate if you subscribe through www.musicteacherstore.com.


MusicTeacherStore.com is our newest advertiser here on Music Matters Blog, and we are grateful for their support of the online music education community! If you are interested in finding out more about how you can promote your company, event, or product, just send me an e-mail and I’ll let you know about our advertising packages.

How to Prepare for Your Music Education Degree – Guest Post

If you will be juggling full-time work plus earning an online music education degree, you’ll need to have a plan in place that could help streamline your life. In addition to taking college seriously, setting goals, managing expectations, and making the most of support systems like family and friends, you should understand how to best prep for your music education degree as a nontraditional student.

Knowing exactly how you will use your degree can help get you through the tough times ahead. While it may not be easy to balance current career demands with studying for finals or writing papers, if you remain focused on your goals, you should find earning a college degree a great way to jumpstart a new career.

Here are some tips to help you make the most of your online music education degree:

Expectations. When you apply to a college to earn your online music education degree, there are certain things typically expected of you. You should have:

  • some type of background in vocal or musical performance, so experience with playing instruments or singing will be a plus.
  • basic music theory is often assumed and/or covered quickly when in college.

Also, be prepared to audition since some music programs require it as part of your application process.

Coursework. As an online music education student, you may take classes such as Basic Ear Training, Music Notation, Counterpoint, or Arranging:  Rhythm Section. It may also be a good idea to keep a portfolio of your accomplishments, as you earn your online music education degree, since you usually receive hands-on music education experience in the form of juries and recitals.

Careers. As an online music education major, you have already decided upon your college major or specialty. However, what careers could you have with a music education degree? Depending on your level of higher education and whether or not you earn a bachelor’s, master’s, or PhD, you could be a Music Professor, an Early Childhood Music Educator, a Music Consultant, or a School Music Educator. Skills like teaching, leadership qualities, musical talent, and thorough music knowledge could help you jumpstart your career upon college graduation.

Accreditation and Certification. It is important that the online music degree you are earning is from an accredited college should you need to transfer credits or seek employment after graduation where a certain type of accreditation is desired. In addition to the importance of accreditation from a legit accrediting agency, most states require you to have a bachelor’s degree in music in order to be certified. If you want to teach music education in your state, you should check in advance to ensure the music education program you enroll in will grant teacher certification upon graduation. The National Association of Schools or Music (NASM) is a great resource to check out.

Social Media and the Internet. Make the most of tools such as the Internet and social media when you are researching colleges and music education programs. Setting up a LinkedIn profile may help you connect with other music education professionals and network. Use Pinterest to organize your college search by creating boards and pinning school info and college tips that you find helpful. Conduct regular Internet searches that may turn up links to sites which offer free sheet music or K-12 music education resources.

Earning your online music education degree, while working full-time in another career, doesn’t have to be overwhelming. If you follow the tips mentioned above, you should discover the process of going back-to-college and simultaneously having a career may be fulfilling as well as rewarding. Be sure to think about where you want to live after graduation in addition to frequently perusing job openings in those states.


Liisa Jaaskelainen works for eLearners.com where she manages the online community. In her free time she enjoys spending time outdoors and working out.