Coming December 1 – A Week of Giveaways!

Merry Christmas to…You!

Despite my best intentions, activity here on Music Matters Blog continues to be sporadic and infrequent. I am still hopeful that I’ll figure out a way to begin posting more regularly again, but in the meantime I thought it would be fun to put together a special selection of giveaways just in time for you to treat yourself to something fun for Christmas this year!

Starting on December 1, I’ll be posting a new giveaway each morning for 5 days. Check in each day to find our more about these exciting new resources, and leave a comment for a chance to win one for yourself!


Notes from Making Sense Out of Digital Scores

As I mentioned, I just attended the live webinar presented by George Litterst in collaboration with MTNA: Making Sense Out of Digital Scores.

Early in his presentation, George reminds us that “The best way you learn something for yourself is by teaching it to others.” I also tend to focus and learn a lot when I write about it, so I thought I would jot down some notes from the presentation to share with those of you who are interested in learning more about the current state and future of digital scores.

Why Electronic Scores?

We’ve all suffered from the OPBS (Overflowing Piano Bench Syndrome), right? Even my carefully planned system of organization eventually overflowed the file cabinets and I finally had to take drastic measures to reduce my collection of printed music. All of this becomes a non-issue with the use of digital scores, which are all contained in the form of bits (binary integers) on a single mobile device. Along those same lines, an iPad – or similarly-sized device – is easy to transport, and you don’t have to worry about printed scores getting damaged, stained, or yellowed over time.

Mr. Litterst also spent some time discussing various wireless page turning devices and demonstrating how they work via foot pedals. Some move the score up one stave at a time; others flip the top half, then the bottom half of the page; others function more like a full page being manually turned.

He makes a point to let us know that the buttons that supply functionality in many electronic scores are often hidden from view. It’s often necessary to tap or hold your finger on the screen to display additional features and functions. Using the app ForScore Mr. Litterst demonstrates selecting and using an annotation feature to jot down notes directly onto the score.

Drawbacks teachers might experience include unfamiliarity, inability to place stickers on the page, absence of that new book scent, and a smaller size page.

Types and Availability of Electronic Scores

Mr. Litterst continued his webinar with an overview of the types and of electronic scores and where to find them. You can scan them in yourself, converting printed scores to PDF files. You can download them for free from the Internet ( is a fabulous repository of public domain music available for free download!). You can print to PDF from a notation software. You can also purchase and download electronic scores either in PDF or using a proprietary program. He briefly discusses the challenge of organizing electronic scores once downloaded and mentions the app NextPage which allows you to drag and drop files using a computer window (using either iTunes or iMazing for your interface). One of the webinar attendees also recommends the app iMazing for iPad organization.

What to Look for in Electronic Scores

After a discussion of important considerations when acquiring electronic scores, Mr. Litterst goes into the more technical side of things, discussing the advent of Music XML. Music XML is a code designed to be both human-readable and machine-readable. A quick glimpse of the code behind an electronic file reveals lots of familiar terms indicating placement of clefs, symbols, and more. For practical use, a teacher could export an XML file of a composition in Finale, then import it onto an iPad via an app designed to read XML files and allow interaction on the user end. He reminds us that there is no substitute for exploring the options on your own, building familiarity, and determining what works best for you.

It’s truly fascinating to hear about the technology being developed in the music world and consider the possibilities for the future! Thanks to George Litterst for all the time he has spent not only learning and developing these possibilities, but also sharing them with the rest of us!

Mr. Litterst will also be presenting at the 2016 MTNA Conference in San Antonio, TX, so be sure to catch his session there if you want to learn more about this technology!

Making Sense Out of Digital Scores

Even though I love technology and am always up for trying out new things, the iPad mini that I acquired earlier this year has spent much of its time relegated to the top drawer of my night stand. (Doesn’t it look sad and neglected?) I know some of th neglect has been so to my shifting educational philosophies, but some of it is also because I haven’t taken the time to educate myself on the best and most efficient ways to utilize the latest technology. So, I’m excited to be signed up for a live webinar in less than an hour with George Litterst, a pioneer in music education technology, on “Making Sense Out of Digital Scores.” I’ll try to report back on what I learn and let you know if my iPad will be receiving a little more attention in the days ahead!

Got Wolfie?

If you haven’t heard about the Wolfie App yet, you might be living under a piano bench… :-) This interactive app for both teachers and students is taking the piano teaching world by storm! If you have students preparing for a recital or competition, the next webinar they are offering is for you. Wolfie’s Digital Education Expert, Nathan Smith, will be walking attendees through the process of using the app to help students observe and fine tune performances. The webinar will be this Thursday, November 12, from 11:00-12:00 CST.

Even though I’ve become somewhat averse to emphasizing technological use in the studio (thanks to all that I’m learning as we shift to a Classical model of education as we homeschool our children), I am intrigued about the possibility of using apps that truly help students improve their piano playing skills. I have Wolfie downloaded on my iPad, and I’m hoping to take a closer look at it over our Thanksgiving break so I can see if and how I should best utilize it in our studio. I’m also excited that Nathan will be offering a regular Wolfie Hour each (non-holiday) week via the GoToWebinar platform so that teachers can drop in, ask questions, and discuss teaching-related issues with one another.

If you’re interested in checking it out or attending the live webinar, you can view all the event info here: And if you’ve used Wolfie in your studio I’d love to know what you think of it and what aspects you have found most helpful for your students!

Watch The Orpheus Chamber Orchestra Live Stream from Dresden!

From the website: “The Dresden Music Festival celebrates the ten year anniversary of the reconstruction of the Frauenkirche with an exceptional concert featuring the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra from New York, alongside the cellist Jan Vogler and the violinist Mira Wang in the Dresden Frauenkirche.”


The performance will air at 2:00 p.m. EST on Saturday, October 24, in the United States. The Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (from NYC) will be performing the following program:





It’s so cool that we have the opportunity via technology to tune into great performances like this from anywhere in the world!

Watch Two Piano Concerts Live from Your Own Home! recently announced that they will be airing two upcoming piano concerts live on their website and on YouTube. What a fabulous opportunity for those of us who can’t make it to these performances in person!

Marc-André Hamelin will be performing on Tuesday, October 6, 2015, at 7:30 p.m. CDT at Bass Performance Hall (in Fort Worth, TX). His program is as follows:

MOZART Sonata in D Major, K. 576
DEBUSSY Images, Book II
HAMELIN Variations on a Theme by Paganini (2011)
SCHUBERT Sonata in B-flat Major, D. 960

Garrick Ohlsson will be performing on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. CDT at Bass Performance Hall (in Fort Worth, TX). His program is as follows:

BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major, op. 110
SCHUBERT Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (“Der Wanderer”)

Scherzo No. 4 in E Major, op. 54
Etude in E Minor, op. 25, no. 5
Etude in G-sharp Minor, op. 25, no. 6
Nocturne in C Minor, op. 48, no. 1
Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, op. 23

Free Wolfie iPad App Webinar this Wednesday

Have you heard of Wolfie? One of the teachers in our local association [of MTNA] first mentioned it at a meeting we held last year to discuss studio technology and apps. I was fascinated by it, but didn’t yet have an iPad, so I couldn’t check into it much. Thanks to a couple of generous gifts, I was able to purchase an iPad mini earlier this summer, so I’m in the process of figuring out the best ways to utilize it in the studio. Wolfie seems pretty incredible with its database of musical scores, ability to track where you are playing and turn the page for you, handle annotations you want to make on the score, and keep track of the progress of students in your studio that are using the app for their own piano practicing!

Wolfie iPad App

These things sound fabulous, but I’ve only caught a glimpse of them in action, so I was excited to learn that the creators of Wolfie will be conducting a free webinar this Wednesday (11:00 a.m. CST) for teachers who want to find out more. I’m looking forward to learning more and seeing how I can implement this in my studio this year!

(If you’re interested in attending, just visit the Facebook Event for the Free Wolfie iPad Webinar and click the link to register.)

Welcome to Fall Special Coupon!

I know I’m a few days after the official beginning of fall, but I’m sure enjoying the gorgeous days! So, in honor of another fall of teaching, I’m offering a special sale in the Music Matters Blog store. You can get $5 off any order by entering the following coupon code when you checkout: 05355663

By far, the favorite item in the store is 5 for Fun! Games and Activities for the Private Piano Lesson. These are tried and true games that we have used for years in the studio. Last year, my students loved perusing this book and selecting games they wanted to play as part of the e.p.i.c. practice incentive. But I also find myself referring to the book to pick out specific games to help reinforce a concept I’m working on with a student.

The coupon will be good until next Friday, October 10, so have fun picking out any item you’d like! Hope you all are enjoying a lovely fall of teaching!

Two Great New Resources!

Many moons ago I, like most music teachers, dreaded the “b” word. We love to teach, to play, to create. But, by and large, we do not like to do bookkeeping. I don’t mind finances at all, but I had such a difficult time collecting money from families or reminding them when they had overdue lesson fees, etc. Then in 2006 that all changed. Music Teacher’s Helper came on the scene and that has forever changed! This is probably the best money I spend every month because once I have everything set up for the year, I create automatic invoicing and the whole process is seamless. Families receive their invoice on the first of each month with their lesson fee amount plus any additional materials, book, or event fees. They can pay on-line or check their account at any time for details.

My posts about MTH always seem to turn into sales pitches, but the main reason I’m posting is because they have finally revamped their IOS app, and I am super thrilled! I do a lot of business from my iPhone, so it’s been a pain not having a working MTH app to record student payments, update info, etc. The new interface looks great, and I can highly recommend the whole MTH package to any teacher looking to make the business side of their studio operations a headache-less venture! (When you click on the links in this post for Music Teacher’s Helper, you’ll receive 20% off your first month and Music Matters Blog will receive a small commission that helps keep this site running.)

I am still pretty much in love with Piano Safari – the latest and greatest (in my humble opinion :-) ) piano method on the market! The students who started and are still working through it have done so well and truly enjoy making music at the piano. Even though they are learning more musically rich music via rote teaching right from the start, the approach to reading rhythms and notation is thorough and effective.

So I was excited to see that the Sight Reading and Rhythm Cards for Level 3 are now available! What’s even better is that if you order the package of all three sets of Sight Reading and Rhythm Cards (and believe me, you want these no matter what method you are using with your students!) are available for 20% off for a limited time. There are so many great ways to use these cards in the lessons (this week we’ve been having fun using rhythm instruments to play the rhythm patterns while selected rhythms from my keyboard provide a steady – but fun – beat in the background!) and the students enjoy having easy-to-manage exercises that they can work on and achieve success in their sight reading endeavors. I have a few students working through the Level 2 books and cards right now, so I’m excited to check out this new set of cards for Level 3!