Win a Free 3-Month Subscription to the New Piano Cub App!

Dr. David Brown, an innovative music educator, has gathered a team and developed an app to help students learn to read and play the piano. He has just recently launched PianoCub (and has a Kickstarter campaign running right now), and he has offered to giveaway a free 3-month subscription to one Music Matters Blog reader! Just leave a comment below to be entered in the drawing. The winner will be drawn using a random number generator on Friday, July 29, at noon (CST).

Here’s a preview of the first lesson:

Dr. Brown says,

PianoCub is a brand new piano education tool that’s perfect for students as well as a supplement for piano teachers. PDF lessons are accompanied by HD videos and state-of-the-art graphics with notes that highlight in correspondence to video performance. You can check out a video and samples at http://www.pianocub.com/.

Guiding Students to Become Independent Learners and Musicians

The more I learn about Classical education, the more I am inspired to help my students become effective learners in every area of their studies. After reading this insightful post by Katherine Fisher, one of the authors of my absolute favorite piano method (Piano Safari, in case you didn’t know :-)), I am contemplating ways of incorporating more rote teaching even with my older students as a way of helping them make better connections with what they are playing and the underlying structure of the music. The deeper their understanding of music and how it is structured, the better equipped they will be to learn on their own.

Katherine says this,

I do believe the beginning of the process [of becoming independent learners and musicians] for students is to develop the discipline to concentrate and store information in a logical way. In the realm of piano pedagogy, I believe this translates to teachers encouraging students to learn and memorize a large amount of music. This should not be done in a “blind” sort of way in which there is no understanding of how the music is constructed. On the contrary, students should understand from the beginning that music is composed of patterns and a logical form. For musicians, this is an essential element of the art of learning.

Summer Piano Camp Roundup

This will be the first summer in a long time that I haven’t held a piano camp in my studio. It’s always so much fun to brainstorm and create a week of fun-filled music games and activities centered on a specific theme (although I think Carnival of the Animals will always be my favorite!). However, this year my students and I all decided that a break was the preferred option. 🙂

So, in lieu of my own to share, I thought I would round up some of the summer piano camp inspirations from around the web:

Joy Morin’s Summer Composition Camp looks fabulous! What a bunch of talented young musicians.

I haven’t seen a new piano camp at Sheryl Welle’s Notable Music Studio Blog, but she has tons of games to explore in addition to her well-loved Road Trip USA summer piano camp!

This isn’t specifically a piano camp, either, but I could see Wendy Steven’s Rhythm Explorations series being used as the main curriculum for a fun rhythm camp!

Here’s a helpful resource from Trevor and Andrea at Teach Piano Today on How to Use a Summer Piano Camp to Grow Your Studio.

Jennifer Foxx always does great projects in her studio, and has put together Let’s Go to the Movies, a piano camp/workshop where they learned about music in the movies and completed silent movie projects. Watch her studio blog for pictures!

Those are a few of my findings thus far. If you have or know of a summer piano camp that could inspire or be purchased by other music teachers, please share!